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General Practice 2023

Metoclopramide (Plasil): what it is for, how to take it and side effects

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Metoclopramide (Plasil): what it is for, how to take it and side effects
Metoclopramide (Plasil): what it is for, how to take it and side effects
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Metoclopramide is an antiemetic drug indicated for the relief of nausea and vomiting caused by surgery, metabolic or infectious diseases, or side effects of other drugs. In addition, metoclopramide can also be used to facilitate radiological examinations using X-rays in the gastrointestinal tract.

This drug is marketed under the trade name Plasil, but can also be found under the similar names Vomistop or Plabel, for example, or in generic form as Metoclopramide Hydrochloride.

Metoclopramide can be purchased in pharmacies or drugstores in the form of tablets, drops or injectable solution, and should only be used with medical indication.

What is it for

Metoclopramide is indicated for the treatment or prevention of nausea and vomiting caused by surgical procedures, metabolic or infectious diseases, or due to side effects of drugs or treatment such as chemotherapy.

Furthermore, metoclopramide is indicated to facilitate examinations such as X-rays of the gastrointestinal tract.

Metoclopramide works by increasing contractions of the muscles of the digestive tract, accelerating gastric and intestinal emptying, helping to relieve nausea and vomiting, and its onset of action is about 30 to 60 minutes after taking it by mouth. oral.

How to take it

The way to take metoclopramide varies by presentation and includes:

1. Metoclopramide drops 4 mg/mL

Metoclopramide drops contain 4 mg of metoclopramide hydrochloride for every 1 mL of solution, and should be taken orally, approximately 10 minutes before meals.

The recommended doses of Plasil drops for children vary according to the age and weight of the child, starting with the lowest possible dose and should not exceed a dose of 0.5 mg per kg of body weight per day. The use of Plasil in children should always be used with pediatrician indication and guidance.

For adults, the recommended dose is 53 drops, 3 times a day, that is, every 8 hours.

2. Metoclopramide tablets 10 mg

The metoclopramide tablet should be taken orally, with a little water, about 10 to 30 minutes before meals, as directed by your doctor.

The recommended dose is 1 tablet of metoclopramide 10 mg, 3 times a day, ie 1 tablet every 8 hours.

3. Metoclopramide oral solution 1 mg/mL

Metoclopramide oral solution contains 1 mg of metoclopramide hydrochloride for every 1 mL of solution and should be taken orally, approximately 10 minutes before meals, as directed by your doctor.

The recommended doses of metoclopramide oral solution for adults is 10 mL, which is approximately 2 teaspoons, 3 times a day.

For children, the dose must be calculated by the pediatrician according to the child's age and weight, starting with the lowest possible dose and should not exceed a dose of 0.5 mg per kg of body weight per day.

4. Injectable metoclopramide 5 mg/mL

Injectable metoclopramide must be used with medical indication and applied directly into the vein or muscle by a nurse or he alth professional with knowledge in injection administration, in hospitals or he alth centers.

The recommended dose for adults is 1 ampoule every 8 hours to treat nausea and vomiting, or 1 to 2 ampoules 10 minutes before X-rays of the gastrointestinal tract are performed.

For children, the dose must be calculated by the pediatrician according to the child's age and weight, starting with the lowest possible dose and should not exceed a dose of 0.5 mg per kg of body weight per day.

Possible side effects

Some of the most common side effects that can occur during treatment with metoclopramide are drowsiness, excessive tiredness, feeling of lack of energy, headache, mental confusion, depression or insomnia.

Metoclopramide can cause extrapyramidal reactions, especially in children or young adults, and may occur after a single dose, perceived through symptoms such as tremors in the body or in the legs and arms, biting the lips, frowning or rolling the eyes. eyes out of control, slow body movements, muscle stiffness or mental confusion. In these cases, the use of metoclopramide should be discontinued and the nearest emergency room should be sought.

Immediate medical attention or the nearest emergency department should be sought if symptoms of a severe allergic reaction to metoclopramide such as difficulty breathing, feeling of a closed throat, swelling of the mouth, tongue or face, or hives develop.Know how to identify the symptoms of a severe allergic reaction.

Does metoclopramide make you sleepy?

One of the most common side effects that can occur with metoclopramide use is drowsiness, so it is likely that some people who take the drug will feel sleepy during treatment.

What are extrapyramidal reactions?

Extrapyramidal symptoms are a set of body reactions, such as tremors, difficulty walking or staying calm, feeling restless or changes in movements, which arise when an area of ​​the brain responsible for coordinating movements, called of Extrapyramidal System, is affected, which happens by side effects of drugs, as is the case of metoclopramide or being a symptom of some diseases. Learn how to identify extrapyramidal reactions.

Who should not use

Metoclopramide should not be used by children under 1 year of age and is not recommended for persons under the age of 18, pregnant or breastfeeding women, unless directed to do so by a physician.

This medicine should also not be used by people who are allergic to metoclopramide or any other component of the formula, or by people who have had extrapyramidal reactions after using metoclopramide.

Furthermore, metoclopramide should not be used by people who have gastrointestinal bleeding, mechanical obstruction or perforation, epilepsy, pheochromocytoma, Parkinson's disease, or a movement disorder called tardive dyskinesia caused by the use of psychosis drugs or anesthetics.

Before taking metoclopramide, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, heart failure, high blood pressure, diabetes, or a history of depression so the doctor can weigh the risks and benefits of treatment.

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