General Practice 2022

What does urine color mean (dark, yellow, white, orange)

Table of contents:

What does urine color mean (dark, yellow, white, orange)
What does urine color mean (dark, yellow, white, orange)
Anonim

The color of urine can change due to the ingestion of certain foods or medications, and therefore in most cases it is not a warning sign. However, the change in color can also indicate some he alth problem, such as a urinary tract infection, kidney stone or liver inflammation.

The normal color of urine is light yellow, indicating that the person is properly hydrated and that the hydration level is sufficient to promote proper elimination of toxins. However, in cases where the urine has a darker color or color other than yellow and transparent and is accompanied by other symptoms such as strong-smelling urine, burning when urinating or abdominal pain, for example, it is important that the doctor is consulted..See what could be making your urine dark and smelly.

If the color of the urine remains altered for more than 3 days, it is recommended to consult the general practitioner, urologist or gynecologist for an assessment of possible signs and symptoms presented by the person, in addition to being recommended to carry out the urinalysis to identify the cause of the color change.

1. Transparent urine

Clear urine is usually indicative that the person is drinking too much water, so the urine is very dilute.

What to do: normally it is not necessary to carry out any type of treatment, however the doctor may recommend that the person drink a little less water during the day, as it is It is common in these cases for the person to feel like going to the bathroom very often.

2. Dark yellow urine

Dark yellow urine is one of the most common changes and is usually a sign of dehydration, due to low water intake.However, when dark urine remains for a long time, it can be a sign of liver problems that cause bilirubin to build up, leaving the urine an almost brown color.

What to do: in these cases it is recommended to increase the daily water intake and, if it is maintained for more than 3 days, it is important to consult a general practitioner.

3. Orange urine

Orange urine can appear due to excessive intake of foods rich in beta-carotene, such as carrots, papaya or pumpkin, or medications such as Phenazopyridine or Rifampicin. In addition, the orange color can also happen in the case of liver and bile duct diseases, especially when accompanied by white or pale stools. Dehydration can also cause the urine to be orange in color.

What to do: you should avoid eating foods rich in beta-carotene in excess. However, if the change persists or if you are being treated with the remedies indicated above, it is advisable to consult your general practitioner to start the appropriate treatment.See a more complete list of foods to avoid.

4. Red or pink urine

Red or pink coloration is usually caused by the presence of blood in the urine and, therefore, can be a sign of urinary infection, kidney stone or kidney problems, prostate growth, tumors, kidney cyst or in people who go for long walks or runs, and may also be accompanied by other symptoms such as pain when urinating or fever.

However, the red color can also be caused by the consumption of reddish foods such as beets or products with red food coloring. Learn more about when it really is blood in the urine and what to do.

Some medications can also make the urine red or pink, as in the case of Rifampicin and Phenazopyridine.

What to do: if reddish foods have been ingested, avoid eating these foods to assess whether the urine returns to normal. In other cases, it is recommended to consult a general practitioner to diagnose the problem and initiate appropriate treatment.

In case it is caused by the use of medication, it is advisable to inform the doctor who prescribed the medication so that the possibility of changing the medication can be evaluated.

5. Purple urine

Purple urine is an alteration that appears only in some patients with a urinary catheter due to the transformation of some pigments by bacteria found in the catheter tube. See how to avoid this change and take care of the probe correctly.

There is also a rare condition called Purple Urine Bag Syndrome, which is more common in older women who have a permanent or long-term bladder catheter, for example.

What to do: in these cases it is recommended to consult the general practitioner or a urologist because it may be necessary to start treatment with antibiotics.

6. Blue urine

Blue urine is usually caused by blue dyes or the use of methylene blue contrast agent widely used in CT scans, liver surgeries, such as ERCP or drugs such as Sepurin, for example.

Furthermore, it can be caused by some other drugs such as Amitriptyline, Indomethacin and Sildenafil, which is marketed under the name Viagra.

What to do: is a normal change in urine that usually disappears within about 24 hours after using the contrast agent.

7. Green urine

Green urine is not a serious condition, it is mainly caused by ingestion of food, artificial dyes, medications such as Amitriptyline, or by the use of contrast in some diagnostic tests. Learn more about the causes of green urine.

Some infections, such as those caused by Pseudomonas, and the presence of a bladder fistula in the intestine, where bile is released, can also turn the urine green.

What to do: eliminate very green foods or products that may contain food colorings from your diet. However, if the problem persists for more than 2 days, it is advisable to go to the general practitioner to identify the problem and start the appropriate treatment.

8. Brown urine

Brown or very dark urine is usually a sign of severe dehydration, however, it can also indicate liver problems, such as hepatitis or cirrhosis, for example. Also, some medications like Methyldopa or Argirol can darken the urine. Check out when dark urine can be serious.

Likewise, excess of some foods can also make urine dark, as is the case with fava beans, for example.

What to do: in these cases it is recommended to increase your water intake and, if the change persists, consult a urologist or general practitioner to identify the cause of the problem and start the proper treatment.

In case it is caused by food or medication, it is advisable to consult the doctor to change the treatment or the nutritionist to change the diet.

9. White urine

White urine, also known as albuminuria, can be caused by the presence of a severe urinary infection, usually accompanied by burning when urinating and fever.In addition, whitish urine can also be caused by a lymphatic fistula that arises especially in cases of neoplasia or abdominal trauma.

What to do: It is advised to consult a general practitioner to perform a urinalysis and identify the problem to initiate appropriate treatment.

Popular topic