Bulas and Medicines 2022

Octreotide: what é, what it is for and how to use it

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Octreotide: what é, what it is for and how to use it
Octreotide: what é, what it is for and how to use it
Anonim

Octreotide is a synthetic protein, similar to the somatostatin hormone, which is naturally produced by the body, indicated for the treatment of acromegaly, a condition in which there is excessive production of growth hormone (GH), as it acts by inhibiting the growth hormone.

This drug is found in pharmacies or drugstores, but also in hospitals, in the form of an injection, with the trade names Sandostatin in doses of 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, or 0.5 mg, or Sandostatin LAR, in doses of 20 mg or 30 mg.

Octreotide can be applied under the skin or directly into muscle, by a he althcare professional, under medical supervision, doses depending on the condition being treated, and should not be used by persons under 18 years of age or older. while breastfeeding.

What is it for

Octreotide is indicated for the treatment of some he alth conditions, such as:

  • Acromegaly;
  • Neuroendocrine tumors located in the intestine;
  • Carcinoid tumors;
  • Vipomas;
  • Glucagonomas;
  • Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome;
  • Insulinomas.

Furthermore, octreotide may be prescribed by the physician for the treatment of refractory diarrhea associated with AIDS or gastrointestinal tumors, prevention of complications after pancreas surgery, or to stop bleeding caused by gastroesophageal varices in people with cirrhosis.

How to use

Octreotide is an injection that can be administered by a he althcare professional, under the skin, directly into the gluteal muscle or directly into a vein, as directed by the physician.

Typical recommended doses of octreotide for adults depend on the condition being treated and the drug presentation, and include:

1. 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, or 0.5 mg octreotide

Octretotide 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, or 0.5 mg can be applied subcutaneously, which is under the skin, or intravenously, given directly into a vein in hospitals, by the nurse and under medical supervision.

Typical recommended doses for adults vary with the condition being treated and include:

  • Acromegaly: The starting dose is usually 0.05 mg to 0.1 mg every 8 to 12 hours by subcutaneous injection. Dosage is determined by titration every 2 weeks until reaching a dose of 0.1 mg 3 times a day. The maximum dose is 1.5 mg per day;
  • Diarrhea (from gastrointestinal tumor): The starting dose is usually 0.05 mg by subcutaneous injection 1 or 2 times daily. This dose may be increased by the physician up to 0.1 to 0.2 mg 3 times a day;
  • Diarrhoea (Refractory AIDS-Related): The starting dose is usually 0.1 mg by subcutaneous injection 3 times daily. If diarrhea does not improve after one week of treatment, the doctor may increase the dose to up to 0.25 mg 3 times a day. After one week, if there is no improvement, the treatment should be stopped by the doctor;
  • Gastroesophageal varices: the initial dose is usually 25 micrograms per hour, by injection into the vein, for 5 days in continuous infusion, performed only in a hospital environment by the nurse, under medical supervision.

It is important to follow all medical recommendations and not stop treatment on your own. Subcutaneous octreotide injections can be administered by the person at home, as directed by the doctor and nurse. Learn how to give a subcutaneous injection at home.

2. 20 mg or 30 mg octreotide

Octreotide 20 or 30 mg should be injected into the gluteal muscle by a nurse in a hospital setting.

Octreotide doses for adults generally range from 10 mg to 30 mg, intramuscularly, every 4 weeks, and should be guided by the doctor according to the performance of blood tests to measure the levels of the hormone of the growth and response to treatment.

Possible side effects

The most common side effects of octreotide are diarrhea, stomach pain or discomfort, excess fat in the stool, intestinal gas, nausea, vomiting, burning or pain at the injection site, abnormalities in the gallbladder and biliary tract, abnormal or decreased heart rate, changes in the conduction of cardiac nerve impulses.

Who should not use

Octreotide should not be used by children or adolescents under the age of 18, by breastfeeding women, or by people with gallbladder disease or stones.

In addition, this remedy should not be used by people allergic to octreotide or any other component of the formula.

The use of octreotide during pregnancy should only be done if indicated by the doctor, after evaluating the benefits of the treatment for the woman and the risks for the fetus.

Octreotide 20 mg or 30 mg should not be applied under the skin or directly into a vein.

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