General Practice 2022

Calendário de vaccinação do babeê: from birth to 4 years

Table of contents:

Calendário de vaccinação do babeê: from birth to 4 years
Calendário de vaccinação do babeê: from birth to 4 years
Anonim

The baby's vaccination schedule includes the vaccines that the child must take from birth to 4 years of age, since the baby when it is born does not have the necessary defenses to fight infections and vaccines help to stimulate the protection of the organism, reducing the risk of getting sick and helping the child to grow he althy and have an adequate development.

All vaccines on the calendar are recommended by the Ministry of He alth and, therefore, are free, and must be administered at the maternity hospital or at a he alth post. Most vaccines are applied to the thigh or arm of the child and it is essential that parents, on the day of the vaccine, take the vaccination booklet to record the vaccines that have been administered, in addition to setting the date of the next vaccination.

See 6 good reasons to keep your vaccination book up to date.

Vaccines that the baby should take

According to the 2020/2021 vaccination schedule, the recommended vaccines from birth to 4 years of age are:

At birth

  • BCG vaccine: it is administered in a single dose and prevents severe forms of tuberculosis.
  • Hepatitis B Vaccine: the 1st dose of the vaccine prevents hepatitis B, which is a disease caused by a virus, HBV, which can affect the liver and lead to the development of lifelong complications, being recommended its administration within the first 12 hours after birth.

2 months

  • Hepatitis B vaccine: administration of the second dose is recommended;
  • Triple bacterial vaccine (DTPa): first dose of the vaccine that protects against diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough, which are diseases caused by bacteria;
  • Hib vaccine: first dose of the vaccine that protects against infection by the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae;
  • VIP Vaccine: 1st dose of the vaccine that protects against polio, also known as infantile paralysis, which is a disease caused by a virus. See more about the polio vaccine;
  • Rotavirus vaccine: This vaccine protects against rotavirus infection, which is a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. The second dose can be given up to 7 months;
  • 10V Pneumococcal Vaccine: 1st dose against invasive pneumococcal disease, which protects against various pneumococcal serotypes responsible for diseases such as meningitis, pneumonia and otitis. The second dose can be given up to 6 months.

3 months

  • Meningococcal C vaccine: 1st dose, against serogroup C meningococcal meningitis;
  • Meningococcal B vaccine: 1st dose, against serogroup B meningococcal meningitis.

4 months

  • VIP vaccine: 2nd dose of childhood paralysis vaccine;
  • Triple bacterial vaccine (DTPa): second dose of vaccine;
  • Hib vaccine: second dose of the vaccine that protects against infection by the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae.

5 months

  • Meningococcal C vaccine: 2nd dose, against serogroup C meningococcal meningitis;
  • Meningococcal B vaccine: 1st dose, against serogroup B meningococcal meningitis.

6 months

  • Hepatitis B vaccine: administration of the third dose of this vaccine is recommended;
  • Hib vaccine: third dose of the vaccine that protects against infection by the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae;
  • VIP vaccine: 3rd dose of childhood paralysis vaccine;
  • Triple bacterial vaccine: third dose of vaccine.

From the age of 6 months, it is also recommended to start immunization against the Influenzae virus, which is responsible for the flu, and the child should be vaccinated every year during the campaign period.

9 months

Yellow fever vaccine: first dose of yellow fever vaccine

12 months

  • Pneumococcal Vaccine: Booster vaccine against meningitis, pneumonia and otitis.
  • Hepatitis A Vaccine: 1st dose, with the 2nd dose indicated at 18 months;
  • Triple Viral Vaccine: 1st dose of the vaccine that protects against measles, rubella, and mumps;
  • Meningococcal C Vaccine: booster of the vaccine against meningitis C. This booster can be given up to 15 months;
  • Meningococcal Vaccine B: booster vaccine against type B meningitis, which can be administered up to 15 months;
  • Vaccine against chickenpox: 1st dose;

From the age of 12 months, it is recommended that immunization be performed against poliomyelitis through oral administration of the vaccine, known as OPV, and the child should be vaccinated during the campaign period up to 4 years.

15 months

  • Pentavalent Vaccine: 4th dose of the VIP vaccine;
  • VIP vaccine: booster vaccine against polio, which can be administered up to 18 months;
  • Triple Viral Vaccine: 2nd dose of the vaccine, which can be administered up to 24 months;
  • Vaccine against chickenpox: 2nd dose, can be administered up to 24 months;

From 15 months to 18 months, it is recommended to boost the triple bacterial vaccine (DTP) that protects against diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough, and the booster vaccine that protects against the infection Haemophilus influenzae.

4 years

  • DTP vaccine: 2nd booster vaccine against tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough;
  • Pentavalent Vaccine: 5th dose with DTP booster against tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough;
  • Yellow fever vaccine booster;
  • Polio vaccine: second booster vaccine.

In case of forgetfulness, it is important to vaccinate the child as soon as possible to go to the he alth center, in addition to being essential to take all doses of each vaccine so that the baby is fully protected.

When to go to the doctor after vaccination

After the baby is vaccinated, it is recommended to go to the emergency room if the baby has:

  • Skin changes such as red bumps or irritation;
  • Fever above 39ÂșC;
  • Seizures;
  • Difficulty breathing, coughing a lot, or making noise when breathing.

These signs usually appear up to 2 hours after vaccination and may indicate a reaction to the vaccine. Therefore, when symptoms appear, you should go to the doctor to avoid worsening the situation. In addition, it is also indicated to go to the pediatrician if the normal reactions to the vaccine, such as redness or pain at the site, do not disappear after a week. Here's what to do to alleviate the side effects of the vaccine.

Is it safe to vaccinate during COVID-19?

Vaccination is important at all times of life and therefore should not be interrupted during times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

To ensure everyone's safety, all he alth rules are being complied with to protect those who go to SUS he alth posts for vaccination.

Popular topic